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OWAG Track Light #6—> Sune Nesu (Mexico)

The “Track Light” series serves to briefly introduce a number of individuals involved
with the One World Artist Gallery (OWAG) from their various places around the globe.

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Today, I talk with Mexican painter and street artist Antonio Emmanuel Hernández Torres (Sune Nesu).

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John: Hey, Sune. So, is “Sune Nesu” your real name? It sounds like a combination of the four letters E-N-S-U in two different ways.

Sune: Hi, friends! No, Sune Nesu is not my real name. It’s exactly what you say… a combination of letters in two different ways that I liked and that looked good in graffiti. I liked how it sounds. My real name is Antonio Emmanuel Hernández Torres. 

John: How many years have you been painting?

Sune: I’ve been painting since I was quite young. I first started doing graffiti and public murals in 2009, but it wasn’t until 2014 that I started doing it more seriously. It was then that I decided I wanted to devote myself fully to the world of art.

John: Where did you learn to paint? Did you receive any formal training at school or elsewhere?

Sune: I always say that I learned to paint in the hospital. I say this because at the age of eight I was suffering from chronic renal failure, and this caused me to stay for long periods in the hospital. The way I entertained myself at that time was painting. By the way, I currently have a kidney transplant that my father gave me and I have been healthy by the grace of God for sixteen years now. 

Regarding school instruction– I studied Visual Arts at the Artistic Initiation School #3 of the National Institute of Fine Arts (INBA), and I also took a number of free art workshops in my city.

A wall mural painted by Sune Nesu outside INBA.

John: Your work often seem to focus on animals, or combinations of different animals together, with wild colors and patterns. The DrawBag you painted is done in this style as well. How did you start painting in this way?

Sune: This style originated from my love for animals. Apart from painting, what I love most is learning more about animals. I love watching documentaries about them.

The idea of combination arose one day during a trip with my family to the state of Veracruz in Mexico. I found myself in a landscape with many trees and different types of animals. I remember that I was carrying my sketchbook with me, and I simply started to make my very first drawing that mixed together all the animals that I saw that day. From then on, my style was defined and I was able to continue creating more and more fantastic animals.

John: How does your Mexican culture or heritage influence your artwork?

Sune: My culture and Mexican heritage has helped me a lot in regard to my artwork developing. People who see my style of combining different creatures often say that these fantastic animals are alebrijes. 

The alebrijes are 100% Mexican handcrafts created by the artisan Pedro Linares López originally in 1936, and the alebrijes have been a great inspiration for my own art. The many legends and stories of my country have also had a strong influence on my art, as well as its different locations and landscapes.

Alebrijes from the Museum of African, Oceanic, and American Indian Art (MAAOA) in Marseille, France.
Artisan Pedro Linares López fashioning alebrijes.
Alebrijes at the Pochote Market in the city of Oaxaca, Mexico.

John: That’s interesting because Pedro Linares discovered the alebrijes when he was also very sick and began to have visions. Do you see any spiritual or mystical meaning behind your animals?

Sune: Yes, I know… this connection with Linares is very interesting and inspiring for me! The meaning that I would give to my fantastic animals is that we live in a world that I must fill with colors– these creations have made me strong in my difficult moments, and it is a gift that God has given me to use in order to paint the whole world.

John: Do you work with other artists in Mexico?

Sune: Yes, of course I have collaborated with other artists from Mexico. Although recently, I have been working mostly on my own.

John: What else do you do when you’re not painting… or learning more about animals?

Sune: Even though I spend most of my time creating art, I like to do different things, too. Maybe I’m kind of weird. I love reading comics, playing video games, going out with my family, and going out with my friends…

John: Well, that sounds pretty normal to me, haha. So how can people see more of your work or get in touch with you, Sune?

Sune: You can contact me through either Facebook or Instagram.

I’d like to thank you very much for allowing me to be part of the One World Artist Gallery and share a bit of my artistic life through this interview. I’d also like to send a message to people that if they are going through a difficult time in their life or believe that their dreams are unattainable– fight for those dreams and always trust in God. He will always have an answer for you.

Thank you very much.

John: Thank you, Sune!


(Alebrijes at the Pochote Market in the city of Oaxaca by N Saum is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0, from Wikimedia Commons)

(MAAOA-Alebrijes by Rvalette is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0, from Wikimedia Commons)

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